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businesses also contribute to 52% of the total sales of taxes paid by businesses in the city. it's also important to note for every $100 spent locally owned independent businesses generate $68 iní%( z5 local economic act, and that compares to only $43 by the national chains or chain stores. joining the small business commission, office of small business, and our local partners, women impacting public policy, the san francisco chamber of commerce and sf travel, i wanted to urge everyone to shop locally during this holiday season. and we wish everyone a great and your holiday with your family friends and loved ones. i also wanted to invite people out on thursday, december 6, that's thursday, december 6, in the evening for our annual clementine, join the merchants from the green apple bookstore to park lifee÷jc- gallery and fy notions small businesses like foggy notion as we celebrate the holidays with our great clement street businesses. thank you. >> clerk calvillo: thank you. president chiu. >> president chiu: first of all i'd like to adjourn today's meeting in recognition of the pass
transit, sightseeing buses and public buses. one of the city's most popular tourist destinations. most importantly, adding the potential of 5,000 visitors per day to the marina district or population this neighborhood,7jp%[ and ce adverse impacts on parking and traffic in an already very congested area. drastically altering a residential neighborhood and the businesses already established at fort mason is bold considering the fort mason merchants group do not believe it is a feasible alternative and voted against it. marina green is in capacity due to children's athletic leagues and the different experiences1' tourists have coming to the marina green through the rec and park department. this resolution urgency national park service to abandon plans tu relocate the alcatraz to the fort mason and continue their service at our port. i've already met with mps to encourage them to work with the port and look forward to them continuing that effort. second today i'm introducing legislation in support of our lgbt community that counters discriminatory federal tax policy and to provide a highe
to another city. we do know that this intersection will be closed for the next several hours. that's a concern to residents here because there are three schools in this vicinity. reporting live from milpitas, janine de la vega, ktvu channel 2 news. >>> happening now, a police standoff ended on treasure island a little while ago. christien kafton has been on this story since 4:30 this morning. what do you know now? >> reporter: police are confirming that this standoff did end with the suspect dying from an apparent self-inflicted gunshot wound. we're on treasure island. keep in mind. you can see what appears to be the suspect's vehicle. the suspect's body was just taken from the scene here. he held off police for about five hours here with a gun to his head. police are now allowing cars to come and go from the island. they are using just one lane, though, so access to treasure island is somewhat restricted because they are allowing inbound traffic to come in and then they will stop and allow outbound traffic for a little while. people were stranded for hours as a situation developed
'agata is in gaza city this morning. >> reporter: it's like being on a different planet in gaza city whole world away from what this place was like 24 hours ago. people are smiling, congratulating one another. we had to fight through traffic for the first time. and for the first time people here got a good night's sleep and woke up without the worry of israeli air strikes. palestinians by the thousands rallied in gaza city today in support of hamas and to celebrate the end of the worst fighting gaza has seen for years. city streets that had been deserted for more than a week suddenly sprang to life. workmen began the long clean up after eight days of bombardment from israeli air strikes and mourners buried the last man killed by those attacks before the cease fire took hold. funerals of the 160 people killed, almost half of which were civilians, had to be put on hold for days because it was too dangerous to come out any sooner. the very moment the cease fire took effect last night, palestinians emerged from their homes and filled the streets, cheering and firing weapons i
more speed options, reliability and ways to connect. rethink possible. >>> the city of san jose is facing a crucial question. who is going to be hired as the next police chief. this comes as the department is add odds with the mayor about cutbacks, and as there are major carolinas bout staffing and morale. >> reporter: a meeting is set to get under way in just about 90 minutes here at the community center. it is designed to get residents engaged in the search process. as part of a national search for the next leader of san jose's police department, the city manager is take input from the community. >> we have a series of four meetings to check with residents, what's changed, what are the things that are concerning you, what are the qualities of the next chief that we should look for opinion. >> reporter: the police force currently has nearly 1100 sworn officers. the city said it is looking for a good manager who can deal with constrained resources. >> what we've learned is that the chief of police in san jose really has to have a good mix of being community minded, collaborati
city of san ma monica said no displays at all. now it's in court. joining us to analyze, our legal team, wiel, the wrists seem to be winning. >> they are because a judge said look, to the churches, you can't have that nativity scene up because we're banning all of it. we're banning the church stuff, the christian stuff, jewish stuff. we're ban -- >> bill: why? >> everybody. because what they said was, what the city council said was, we can have all this stuff here, we're having vandalism. it's dossing us money and plus in santa monica wants to look at the ocean. >> bill: so it's disruptive and so who is suing? who is taking it in? >> this is actually pretty interesting because you got a couple of groups here that have aligned together. the santa monica police department association and the nativity scene committee who are trying to keep this nativity scene open. >> bill: they filed suit. >> for 53 years. >> they're saying let us put up our display. this is infringing our rights. we're not trying to say someone else should put up a display, but why with -- >> bill: they're suing the sant
. my college -- public institution that serves the inner-city section of york -- did away with rotc about 16 years after i graduated because of the vietnam war. they have decided to bring it back this year. [applause] >> i want to leave you with one story and one thought. i was in minnesota. they have the military appreciation fund. they collect money for rehab, college, and other things. it unifies the entire state. the speaker was a mother of a national guardsman who had gone three times to iraq. she is a big executive at the target corporation. she did not want to be involved with her son's activities. she went off to see him often. she was named the chair of the parents left behind. look at the young mothers with their children who were crying because her daddy had gotten on the airplane. she thought she owed it to her son and her country into the sun people. she gave me the most haunting line i have never heard -- i quickly learned when you are a military mother, you go home and draw the lines on the window that looked out across the driveway. you cannot bear the idea of the mi
with the government is snarling. migrant workers in cities and students looking for work are among those who are upset. hu also faced dissatisfaction, ethnic minorities and redevelopment. riots erupted in 2008 and in 2009. on the international front, china and hu used the remarkable economic growth to boost its influence. the country hosted the beijing olympics in 2008 and the shanghai expo in 2010. years of economic growth paid off that same year. china surpassed japan in gross domestic product to become the world's second largest economy behind the u.s. the chinese government, with its growing leader, started to flex its muscles in the region. it wrangled with asian nations over control of ireland, in the south china sea, and the east china sea. >>> now we're joined by our correspondent in beijing. you're in the great hall of the people listening to president hu's last speech as communist party general secretary. what do you make of what he said? >> reporter: the most notable part of the speech was when he spoke about an idea he's long supported. he wants to make scientific development, one of the c
basically said if you are a small county in alabama or a city and you want to exchange your election laws or voting laws, you have to basically get it cleared ahead of time in washington and send some sort of form to the justice department to explain what you are going to do or you could go to a federal court. the theory was for 100 years, even though racial discrimination had been outlawed by the 15th amendment, a lot of cities and towns that control the voter rolls had various schemes that prevented blacks from registering to vote, so the federal government -- this is an unusual lot to say we are going to put the whole part of the country under special scrutiny of the federal courts -- that law still exists. the dissected by the voting rights act. it still is the case, if texas wants to change its congressional districts or have a new voter id laws. the networks -- a need to get it cleared from washington. host: how many states are we talking? guest: there are nine states, i think, covered by the law. the formula, i can tell you the simple part of it. it is the deep south. from there it
the facility of the united states postal service located at 320 7th street in ellwood city, pennsylvania, as the sergeant leslie h. sabo jr. post office building. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the rule, the gentleman from arizona, mr. gosar, and the gentleman from missouri, mr. clay, will each control 20 minutes. the chair recognizes the gentleman from arizona. mr. gosar: thank you, mr. speaker. i yield myself such time as i may consume. i ask unanimous consent that all members may have five legislative days to revise and extend their remarks and include extraneous material on the bill under consideration. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, so ordered. mr. gosar: mr. speaker, h.r. 5954, introduced by the gentleman from pennsylvania, mr. altmire, would designate the facility of the united states postal service located at 320 7th street in ellwood city, pennsylvania, as the sergeant leslie h. sabo jr. post office building. the bill is co-sponsored by the entire pennsylvania state delegation and was favorably reported by the committee on oversight and government reform on s
city. and there was a wonderful moment the night before the community opened when one of his lutenants was sitting around a table in arizona and he said how am i going to sell a 30 year mortgage to somebody who is 65-year-old. and they said we should have thought about that before. and they had sleepless nights and the next day 100,000 people came. and they managed to make what was seen as a necessity, a virtue. and this idea of the golden years became a hall mark of the american dream. it's not just retirement that was invented in the last century. even addlessens t idea of youth was concocted in the early part of the century. that word was coined by a 60-year-old. because we were at a situation in the country where there was a proliferation of the night nors of that day. i was talking earlier about night young nor old as the characteristic of so many of news our 50's, 60's, sevent. well there were these young people who weren't children or quite adults. there was a lot of disruption in the country. there was concern about these young people who had physician cal maturity but not emot
like antiques, so she suggested we go to nevada city, take a little trip, and do some antiquing and have a nice breakfast. and i found this little cradle in an antiques shop. and i love the tin lithography, and also that it has a little dog on it. i'm a dog lover. uh-huh, uh-huh. the price was right, so i decided to buy it. well, what was the price? thirty-two dollars. and how long ago was this? a little over a year ago. wow. well, it is a cradle, and it's a lithograph tin. you have beautiful lithography. lithograph tin started coming into play in the very late part of the 19th and the early part of the 20th century. these are kleinert's waterproof baby pants. and of course it's an advertising piece. it's also a point-of-purchase display piece. that's what they call when they put something right near the cash register. and it would entice people to buy it. oh, okay. and i'm sure that they had the little baby pants here inside the cradle with a picture of the little baby in his waterproof pants to advertise the item. and it actually rocks. it's absolutely a charming thing. now, i
their buddies, but it didn't start there. it started in a small town or city or neighborhood like you know when a young person got the feeling that they ought to enter the service. sometimes it is because their father, grandfather, uncle, or brother served. sometimes they lost a loved one. sometimes it was just an idea they got. sometimes they get the complete support of their community and people made a big deal about them leaving. sometimes they do it over some of the protests and concerns of friends or family. sometimes they have tried college or work and it did not work out for them. they decided that they just needed to serve and they do that. once they join the military, it is a completely different life from anything you have done. no matter what the recruiter tell you, it is never like that. [laughter] you get there and immediately the service wants to make you a service member -- a soldier, sailor, airman, marine. they trust you differently. they have to learn a different language. they are trying to make you part of a team. it is no longer part of individual. it is all being part of t
graduation. new york city mayor michael bloomberg calls it the single biggest problem facing the economy and argues that our current approach is national suicide. the good news is we may finally be on the road to a solution. immigration reform has been a taboo topic for the last few years as large and vocal voices within the republican party with considerable public support have blocked any mention of reform. the words they've wanted to hear are border fence and deportation. that's why mitt romney activated a policy of self-deportation during the prisonal campaign. that's why he lost the spanish vote and asian vote to president obama by a landslide. president obama seems emboldened and the republicans chasened. so we have an opening for a deal. what should it look like? >> well, it should look like e bipartisan bond. that one did not even get to the floor of the house or senate for a vote. the right hated it because it provided a legal path for undocumented workers. the left because it reduced family unification and the unions opposed the temporary worker provisions. in an earlier era,
was talking about how back in johnson city the old timer setting aside and played dominoes and one of them says to another, yes, he sure comes up in the world. .. >> he wants of the most important political principles, in order of importance our loyalty, loyalty, loyalty, loyalty, loyalty, loyalty loyalty. courage and compassion are the other two qualities that i think cemented the bond between these people. because they knew that they could trust each other absolutely in these areas. mike, would you talk a little bit about transcends courage and give us a good example of that? >> welcome i suppose the best example is in october of 1968. she and lyndon johnson were leaving the baker hotel in dallas, walking across the street to an event at the adolphus hotel. focusing on well-to-do women who were therefore a event. they carried what mrs. johnson described in her oral history is a sea of angry slogans. she says that they did not like lbj and they hated kennedy. and this mom essentially blocked the passage. it made a very different and difficult for them to get through. and you have to reali
. it started in a small town or city or neighborhood like you know when a young person got the feeling that they should enter the service. sometime it is because their father, grandfather, uncle, or brother served. sometimes it was just an idea they got. sometimes they get the complete support of their community. sometimes they do it over and some of the protest and concerns of friends and family. sometimes they have tried college or work and it did not work out. once they join the military, it is a completely different life from anything you have done. it is never like with the recruiter tells you. [laughter] you get there and immediately the service wants to make you a service member -- a soldier, sailor. they trust you differently. they have to learn a different language. they are trying to make you part of a team. it is all being part of the team. the team is one important than the individual. from the beginning of basic training and advanced training and when they are sent to their first unit, they are always in groups. they are part of that. they are assigned to a permanent force
is in gaza city tonight and, ben, i know a lot of celebrating there. >> there was celebrating earlier in the day. there was a large celebration organized boy various palestinian factions who do see the fact that israel did not launch a ground invasion and that the palestinians were able to get some important concessions like israeli commitment not to conduct military operations in gaza. they considered that a vectry. those are important concessions in their opinion. other gazans not so happy. they discovered, for instance that many of their -- met one woman whose roof was blown off by a bomb nearby. all the windows were broken. she said, nonetheless, she was happy there was a cease-fire and she hoped it would last for another 100 or 200 years. victor. >> all right, ben wedemen in gaza city for us tonight, thank you. >>> let's get to jerusalem now. sara is there. what more do we know about the person arrested for yesterday's bus bombing? >> victor. we want to get to the very latest information that we can give you right now about the investigation into who bombed a bus in tel aviv. the
jersey. c-span: how far away was he driving into new york city? >> guest: he was about half an hour, 45 minutes from new york. c-span: what was the office like? how many people worked around him? >> guest: actually, he had an office in new jersey. he worked for years in manhattan, but the traffic was too much for him. so he moved an office in woodcliff lake, new jersey, and that's where i went. he had a very small staff: four people; he had two secretaries, an administrative assistant and me. c-span: and what was the first day you went to work for him? >> guest: july 3rd, 1990. so right after my graduation. c-span: a total of four years you spent there? >> guest: yes. c-span: how many trips did you take with him? >> guest: i accompanied him on two international trips. in february, i went with him to eastern europe and to russia, and later that year, in april, i went with him to asia. c-span: what do you remember from that experience, the international travel? >> guest: well, i remember so many things. what stands out to me the most, though, is that nixon was so generous and so good to m
the museum for doing this. i have got a friend hear some more. he was the founder of circuit city and he has just written a book called the rise and fall of circuit city. to some degree, they are uncomfortable truth is when you think about nations, companies. of there certainly rise and fall stories. political campaigns are really lousy times to think about the hard truth of what is happening. one of the hard truth about our panel is that we are five white guys. we try to figure out how to divvy this up. we're four tall guys and dog. we are very aware of this. for all of you to e-mail the in, we know. what i wanted to get into today and talk a little bit about are the strategic economic choices facing the nation. what does that mean? we talk about strategy and economics, is there something more fundamental about the way the united states is positioned in the world and its choices? michael has his own followers and accolades. jeff bingaman and i and our whole staff were riveted from much of his staff and guidance at the time. had he moved in along some of the issues we're talking about back t
's 5:00 in new york city. this is "the five." ♪ ♪ >> eric: you know how when your friends who voted for obama are so in the cause they say progressives want to help the little guy and they have the values as all of us? the next time they sell you garbage two stories that are perfect examples of what the left does once they get power. by the way, not looking out for you. first up, george soros, the money behind the far left group moveon.org, he wants chaos at wal-mart on black friday. height of the shopping season. they want picket leans, flash mobs and mass destructions at wal-mart stores. is that what you want when you bring your kids shopping the day after thanksgiving? greg, i am going first off, can you imagine that you walk in a wal-mart, day after thanksgiving, and they have picket signs in the parking lot. you're crazy. >> greg: george soros wouldn't know a wal-mart if he bought one. this is as far away from the billionaire's life. is he the self-appointed labor secretary? why doesn't obama appoint him as the destroy america czar? he hates this place. by the way, chopping is,
last year, aqap attempted to seize the initiative, taking control of several key cities in the south of yemen. in the months since, aqap's advances have been largely reversed through a renewed and each more effective partnership with yemen's new government led by president hadi. our work in yemen is far from done. dismantling aqap, eliminating it as a threat to the united states, will ultimately require sustained pressure, more u.s. training and assistance, close partnership with the yemeni government and yemeni people and steadfast support for political transition. another country we have made good progress in recently is somalia. for years when i became director of the c.i.a., it was thoobs that somalia was a failed state where al-shabab controlled large pieces of territory, declared fealty to al qaeda, brought about a humanitarian crisis and planned attacks in the region but there, too, we have seen significant progress. in large part because of an effective partnership between the united states and the african union mission in somalia. the result is an al-shabab that lost 50% of
-oriented city encircled by soviet-leaning east germany. and so president kennedy was afraid throughout the cuban missile crisis that if they just invaded, that would be over in a certain amount of time. but then the soviets could very easily dot same to berlin. they could just take over berlin without much difficulty. and that would lead, if the west chose, which it probably would have, to a nuclear exchange. so the sequence of likely events in president kennedy's thinking was if cuba fell easily, which we now know it would not have, then the soviets would have taken berlin, which would have led to a conflagration in europe and really the end of the world. >> i want to go back. right around this time there was the civil rights issue at the university of mississippi, and we've got a couple of tapes, one from september 30 of 162 and one from september 22. the first one obviously 292nd with ross barnett. who is he? >> he's governor the mississippi. he's in a tight spot because he's fanned the flames of segregation, thinking he's an ardent segregationist. his political base was based on that. but th
happens in mexico city, in beijing, in hong kong, what you do is you ship in one of the star correspondents, or even an anchor. but the difference between covering the news, year after year after year in a country, maybe even learning the language, certainly getting to know the people, getting to know who the movers and shakers are, and what the political dynamic in that country is, that really is not happening much anymore. and parenthetically, what's happening in our business is also happening over in the intelligence field, at the cia. where quite literally -- >> i don't want to go too far there. we're -- i want to talk to you about the role of cable television. which you touched on before. in a recent interview with bill o'reilly of fox, you've derided ideological coverage of the news, bad for america, you said, making it difficult if not impossible for congress to reach across the aisle and find compromise. you also wrote an op-ed piece, this is not good for the republic. what do you mean? >> what i mean, and this goes back, it's really a continuation of the same thing.
the office open and when something really big happens in kabul, in mexico city, in beijing, in hong kong, what you do is you should then one of the star correspondents or even an anchor. but the difference between covering the news, year after year after year in a country, maybe even learning the language, certainly getting to know the people, getting to know who the movers and shakers are >> i do not want to go too far. i want to talk to a little bit about the role of cable television, for which you touched on before. in a recent interview with bill o'reilly of fox, you said making -- derided ideological coverage of the news bad for america, you said, making it difficult, if not impossible, for congress to reach across the aisle and find compromise. you also wrote in an op-ed piece, this is not good for the rubble. what do you mean? >> this goes back. it is a continuation of the same thing. first of all, in addition to demonstrating that network news divisions could make money, there was a technological explosion. it wasn't just the three networks anymore. you have cable, satellite tele
the cities with the biggest gains? as you know, all real estate is local. some of the bounce back is coming in areas that were really beaten down badly. look at phoenix. the one-year change in home prices up 20%. minneapolis, up 8%. detroit, up almost 8%. san francisco, up 7.5%. so this is pretty key. many cities have not gotten back, even close to peak levels. you're seeing this healing overall in home prices. when i look at home sales from other data i've been looking at, other monthly reports we get, carol, you can see a lot of these deals are cash deals. so some of this is investors. some of this is first-time home buyers. clearly it's more evidence that the housing market is healing. one of the reasons it is healing is because mortgage rates have been very low. can i show you the most recent mortgage rates? anybody out there interested in refinancing? 30-year fixed rate. 15 year, popular refinancing tool. 2.63%. >> wow! >> yeah. those are low mortgage rates. >> i never thought i would see them that low in my lifetime. >> me either. >> christine romans, live in new york. thank you so mu
on this, on secession. you say 100,000 is nothing. go ahead. >> listen, the city of austin is trying to secede from the state of texas, right? >> that's the good move. >> there's people in all of these states we're talking about. no number that will scare me because either they ultimately secede or come to their senses and understand we're greater as a union. >> they're going nowhere. enjoy your turkey. nobody's going anywhere. >> the chairman ruled against secession. we know -- no secession. thank you for coming in. thank you, professor. james peterson. coming up, the right wing conspiracy machine gains speed. read all about it. president obama, catch this, this gets worse tonight, stole the election. wait until you hear that argument. the "sideshow" where that belongs is next . this "hardball." [ male announcer ] this december, remember -- you can stay in and like something... or you can get out there and actually like something. the lexus december to remember sales event is on. this is the pursuit of perfection. >>> welcome back to "hardball." time for the "sideshow," which is whe
of the world. a city built on a hill cannot be head. -- hid. no one after lighting a lamp puts it under a bushel basket, but on a lab stand, and it gives light to all in the house. -- lamp stand, and it gives light to all in the house. the gospel of the lord. in the name of god, amen. >> please be seated. in little prince laid down and wept. 500 roses in a garden. on the planet he ruled, he had a single rose who had told him that she was unique. and yet here were 500 roses, just like her in one garden. i thought i was rich, he thought sadly, with a flower unique in all the universe. then the little prince met a fox who taught him an important lesson about love. to me, the fox said, you are nothing more than a little boy who is just like a thousand other boys. i have no need of you, and you have no need of me. but if you tammy, then we shall need each other. to me, -- tame me, then we shall need each other. to me, you will be unique in all the world. the prince realized that for the roses, he felt nothing. but he loved his rose, far away on his tiny planet, the rose he watered and shelte
. i got my draft notice income across ago looking marine purity city could go to quantico and they will get you in good shape. i had to do both boot camps and one summer. -- in one summer. i then went back and graduated in joined the marine corps. it was the most defining experience of my life. i have all intention of staying in three years and getting out. as i got involved with the people in the leadership and the mission of the marine corps and what we're doing for the country and just the experience itself, i decided to stay. it was a great opportunity for me to serve the country. what i learned from that experience is everyone that you meet in the military and the country has something to offer. everyone has something to offer. everyone is capable of doing something. you are more capable of doing more than what you expect to can do. i always say that we always raise the bar higher. that was some of the experiences. people are extraordinary. the young marines were exceptional all through my career. >> your younger days were a bit different. i read that you grep up in i
going over the fiscal clef. host: david from union city. good morning. are you with us? ok. dave is turning into the tv rather than the phone call. we will look at the peace study. -- pew study. let's go to marie in alabama, a a democrat. good morning. caller: good morning. can you hear me? i think that the states are already represented through their congresspersons. we do not need to have double representation. host: ok. let's go to springfield, georgia on the independent line. caller: good morning. my comment is there are a number of states that are not paying enough to the federal government. they get a lot more money back. to have these states have more input into the crisis, i think it would be a major mistake. the election has been decided already. obama 1. his referendum should be, it just that, what ever he wants. the states are complaining. they're not paying enough to the federal government. you have a lot of other states that are more liberal that are supporting people. host: agusta, georgia. caller: actually, the people have spoken. they have spoken because they reel
to negotiate with the university. ultimately, put on what was the biggest city in in the nation's history, roughly 800 people were arrested for sitting in overnight at the hall. and in the end, the region's revoked this move, essentially admitting that it was an unconstitutional infringement on free speech rights. but when this happened, who are already viewed kerr with suspicion, became convinced that kerr was absolutely untrustworthy, unreliable. because he believed clark kerr failed to crackdown on the free speech movement. and at this point hoover went beyond collecting information about clark kerr, and begin to actively try to get him fired. and the we hoover tried to do this was by leaking information to certain members of the board of regents who were opposed to clark kerr, with the idea that they could then use these allegations against try to convince other regions to find. they recruited an informer in the administration, in the university administration. >> one of the most astonishing things i found in my research is the extent to which the fbi involved itself in university aff
who said that the damage was unprecedented. that it may be the worst storm the city has ever faced. governor christie said the damage in new jersey was unthinkable. we had a fires. we had hurricane-force winds. we had massive of flooding. we had feet of snow. you look at that, the flooding of the subway systems, the shutdown of the stock exchange, you start to get a sense of the massive scale and scope of this storm. and yet, the networks performed. carry dozens of stories about how many consumers only wink to information was through their smartphones. linking social media and their smartphone. while there was obviously an impact, i think the networks performed really well. >> some networks did well, some networks did less well. we do not have a solid information about this because there are no reporting requirements. there are no standards by which we measure performance. it is entirely voluntary as to whether they want to talk to their state and local governments are not. i take their word for its that debate responded well. i also anecdotally heard that some of these guys may be
, guy by the name of delbert g. web. the inventor of sun city, the first large-scale retirement community in the country. if you took a flyer on this idea that later life could be affecting childhood and he built a community and invested $2 million in the late 1950's, early 1960's into the opening of sun city and it was a wonderful moment the night before the community actually opened when one of his lieutenants was sitting around the table at a mexican restaurant in peoria arizona. he said how my for going to sell a 30-year mortgage to summon a 65 years old? maybe we should've thought about that beforehand. they all had sleepless lights and 100,000 people showed up. if you build it, they will come. this was an incog longing for something different than society offered at this stage of life. they essentially managed to make what was seen as a necessity, a virtue and retirement, this idea of the golden years for an extended period is what became the hallmark of the american dream. it's not just retirement that was invented in the last century. it even adolescents, the idea of you
of the infrastructure at the same time. former president reagan frequently talked about america as a city on a hill, a shining example for the world of a nation that ensures opportunity and freedom for all its people. thanks to our country's success in implementing the a.d.a., advancing that law's great goals of full inclusion and full participation, america indeed has become a shining city on a hill for people with disabilities around the globe. by ratifying the crpd, we can affirm our leadership in this field. we can give renewed impetus to those striving to emulate us. we can give them that renewed emphasis by our example and by sitting down with them and working with them, only if we are a signatory to this treaty. and again, you think about american exceptionalism. america, we are a pretty exceptional country when you think about it, in many ways. we're not just exceptional because we have the most tanks, guns and bombs and things like that. but we are exceptional in terms of what we have done for civil rights and human rights and to include all in our family. our family being our citizenship.
in cities from making serious money, acquiring serious property and exercising their rights as urban citizens. they can substitute criteria for urban residents is but they have to change fundamentally the system as it exists. secondly move to aid to child policy. one child is a catastrophe. this will have a long term impact but if they cannot do this at this point, you have to wonder about the ability to take on anything that is politically sensitive. third, establish a legal framework in which ngo's can operate more freely. for example, environment is one of the issues they tag is one of the most important challenges. i agree 100% with that. i know no major country in the world that has made significant progress on environmental cleanup without a vibrant, grain movement. and ngo grain movement that can engage in political activism as well as political education. systems are built around the interests of the leaders. you need some counterpressure. not just pressure from above but from below if you're going to change that. let me conclude with political reform. they need to reconfigur
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